Bringing Light to the Darkness of Human Trafficking (Trafficking in Persons)

Imagine if your daughter were faced with the decision, upon entering college, of whether to major in political science, biology or… porn and prostitution? That scenario is exactly where the logic of considering commercial sex as a legitimate job is leading.

A porn performer named Amaranta Hank recently found an opportunity to promote the sex industry, make money, and gain notoriety by opening her own “Porn University”—a “sex school” where students are taught how to make porn.

The classes include topics such as “what matters in an erection,” “being a porn actress in a macho society,” “how to project your image,” “how to make a profit,” and “how to make the perfect porn scene.” Instruction includes live porn sex demonstrations and literal “hands on workshops” where students are filmed engaging in sex acts.

Although this is the first of its kind, it is quite possible that in this porn-inspired culture the idea will spread into the mainstream. Those who stand to gain from the exploitation of others in the sex industry are aggressively promoting their agenda to normalize commercial sex, to a degree that it is being considered at even the highest levels of government as a “job like any other.” If it is indeed considered a job, profession, trade, or work then what would prevent universities from offering up degrees on being a sex object in sex industry?

However, porn is not a legitimate job for anyone and should never be treated as such. As just one example, contracting serious, potentially life-threatening sexually transmitted infections is a near guarantee when joining the porn industry, and unlike any other job or profession in existence, there are virtually no effective and enforceable protective regulations.

Imagine if your dentist decided to use a straw in his mouth to suction saliva during your dental appointment? It would never happen. However, in porn the so-called “work” requires regularly ingesting bodily fluids of all kinds, including saliva, urine, semen, vaginal fluid and blood. As a result, performers are constantly contracting STIs such as chlamydia, HPV, gonorrhea, hepatitis, bacterial vaginosis, and even HIV/AIDS.

In addition, and even worse, women in the porn industry are often coerced into performing degrading, harmful sex acts. Being strangled, gagged, hit, bound and torn are regular occurrences. As a result of the ongoing violence, degradation and trauma, many women in the industry suffer from depression leading to substance abuse and even suicide.

Today, more than ever before, those who care about the dignity, equality, and rights of women, as well as the protection of children, must take a strong stand against the “pro sex work” narrative that seeks to legitimize one of the most dangerous and exploitative industries in the world.

We need to stand up as abolitionists and declare the truth about porn and prostitution. There is no such thing as “sex work.” Porn and prostitution are not “jobs,” but are forms of exploitation and violence against women that fuel racism and gender inequality.

Article from: https://exoduscry.com/blog/shiftingculture/worlds-first-porn-university-opens/?fbclid=IwAR1cgvSSb-AoafXsNm5_P2Ab3mOJQbPO74Il_D9qkGVMwVK8tzipPEWIlk8